An immunological method for quantifying antibacterial activity in Salmo salar (Linnaeus, 1758) skin mucus

Edgar Narvaez, Jorge Berendsen, Fanny Guzmán, José A A. Gallardo, Luis Mercado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are a pivotal component of innate immunity in lower vertebrates. The aim of this study was to develop an immunological method for quantifying AMPs in Salmo salar skin mucus. A known antimicrobial peptide derived from histone H1 previously purified and described from S. salar skin mucus (SAMP H1) was chemically synthesized and used to obtain antibodies for the quantification of the molecule via ELISA. Using skin mucus samples, a correlation of bacterial growth inhibition versus SAMP H1 concentration (ELISA) was established. The results provide the first evidence for quantifying the presence of active AMPs in the skin mucus of S. salar through the use of an immunological method.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)235-239
Number of pages5
JournalFish and Shellfish Immunology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antibacterial quantification
  • Fish antibacterial peptide
  • SAMP H1
  • Salmo salar

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An immunological method for quantifying antibacterial activity in Salmo salar (Linnaeus, 1758) skin mucus'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this