Disjoint and functional principal component analysis for infected cases and deaths due to covid-19 in south american countries with sensor-related data

Carlos Martin-Barreiro, John A. Ramirez-Figueroa, Xavier Cabezas, VICTOR ELISEO LEIVA SANCHEZ, M. Purificación Galindo-Villardón

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In this paper, we group South American countries based on the number of infected cases and deaths due to COVID-19. The countries considered are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Paraguay, Uruguay, and Venezuela. The data used are collected from a database of Johns Hopkins University, an institution that is dedicated to sensing and monitoring the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic. A statistical analysis, based on principal components with modern and recent techniques, is conducted. Initially, utilizing the correlation matrix, standard components and varimax rotations are calculated. Then, by using disjoint components and functional components, the countries are grouped. An algorithm that allows us to keep the principal component analysis updated with a sensor in the data warehouse is designed. As reported in the conclusions, this grouping changes depending on the number of components considered, the type of principal component (standard, disjoint or functional) and the variable to be considered (infected cases or deaths). The results obtained are compared to the k-means technique. The COVID-19 cases and their deaths vary in the different countries due to diverse reasons, as reported in the conclusions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4094
JournalSensors
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Jun 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Data science
  • Disjoint and functional components
  • Infectious diseases
  • K-means clustering
  • Multivariate statistical methods
  • R software
  • SARS-Cov2
  • Sensing and data extraction

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Disjoint and functional principal component analysis for infected cases and deaths due to covid-19 in south american countries with sensor-related data'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this