Effect of compost and biodegradable chelate addition on phytoextraction of copper by Oenothera picensis grown in Cu-contaminated acid soils

Isabel González, ALEXANDER NEAMAN , Amparo Cortés, Patricio Rubio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Oenothera picensis plants (Fragrant Evening Primrose) grow in the acid soils contaminated by Cu smelting in the coastal region of central Chile. We evaluated the effects of compost, at application rate of 5kgm-2, and biodegradable chelate MGDA (methylglycinediacetic acid), at application rate of 6mmol plant-1, on Cu phytoextraction by O. picensis, in field plots. No significant differences were found between treatments regarding aboveground biomass, shoot Cu concentrations and Cu phytoextraction of O. picensis. This lack of effects of the treatments was provoked by the large variability of soil properties, prior to applying of the treatments. The shoot Cu concentration in O. picensis positively and significantly correlated to exchangeable Cu concentration in the soil. Likewise, the aboveground biomass of O. picensis positively and significantly correlated to soil organic matter content. The Cu phytoextraction by O. picensis, in turn, positively and significantly correlated to both variables, i.e. exchangeable Cu concentration and organic matter content. The average Cu phytoextraction was 1.1mg plant-1, which is equivalent to 90gha-1 at planting rate of 8 plants m-2. In the chelate treatment, Cu phytoextraction was 2.6±2.1mg plant-1, which is equivalent to 212±171gha-1 at planting rate of 8 plants m-2.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-115
Number of pages5
JournalChemosphere
Volume95
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Chelation
  • Cu bioavailability
  • Induced phytoextraction
  • MGDA (methylglycinediacetic acid)
  • Phytoremediation

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