Effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on the protein structure and thermal stability of Sauvignon blanc wine

Gipsy Tabilo-Munizaga, Trudy Ann Gordon, Ricardo Villalobos-Carvajal, Luis Moreno-Osorio, FERNANDO NOE SALAZAR GONZALEZ, Mario Pérez-Won, Sergio Acuña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

38 Scopus citations

Abstract

Protein haze development in bottled white wines is attributed to the slow denaturation of unstable proteins, which results in their aggregation and flocculation. These protein fractions can be removed by using bentonite; however, a disadvantage of this technique is its cost. The effects of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on wine stability were studied. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments were performed to analyse the secondary structure of protein, thermal stability was evaluated with differential scanning calorimetry, while a heat test was performed to determine wine protein thermal stability. The results confirmed that high pressure treatments modified the α-helical and β-sheet structures of wine proteins. Throughout the 60 days storage period the α-helix structure in HHP samples decreased. Structural changes by HHP (450 MPa for 3 and 5 min) improve thermal stability of wine proteins and thus delay haze formation in wine during storage.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-220
Number of pages7
JournalFood Chemistry
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - 15 Jul 2014

Keywords

  • Haze formation
  • High hydrostatic pressure
  • Melting temperature
  • Pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins
  • Secondary structure of protein
  • Wine protein stability

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