Multinomial logistic regression to estimate and predict perceptions of bicycle and transportation infrastructure in a sprawling metropolitan area

Courtney Coughenour, Alexander Paz, HANNS ANIBAL DE LA FUENTE MELLA, Ashok Singh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Inactivity levels in the USA are considered a critical public-health issue. Promoting physical activity through active transportation may prove effective to increase activity levels. The purpose of this study was to understand perceptions and likelihood of using various bicycle infrastructures for transportation by Las Vegas residents. Methods A survey was developed and administered (n = 457). Multinomial regression was used to create predictions to determine which infrastructures were perceived as safe and most likely to be used for transportation; frequencies were analyzed. Results The infrastructure chosen least often (2.2%) had the least amount of distance separating bikers from vehicles, and the least amount of protection. The type most likely to be used (27.6%) contained the most signage and significant separation from vehicles. The infrastructure least likely perceived to be adequate for biker safety was a shared bus/bike lane with 19.4% agreeing this was safe. Probabilities revealed differences in infrastructure preferences based on demographic characteristics. Conclusions In order to increase active transportation rates effectively, residents’ perceptions of safety and infrastructure preferences should be considered. Results from this study showed that respondents had many safety concerns with the current bicycling infrastructure in Las Vegas and provided ideas for future infrastructure investments and related policies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e401-e408
JournalJournal of Public Health (Germany)
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • Communities
  • Environment
  • Physical activity

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