NK-lysin from skin-secreted mucus of Atlantic salmon and its potential role in bacteriostatic activity

Yulema Valero, Jimena Cortés, Luis Mercado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

NK-lysin, despite being a direct effector of cytotoxic T and natural killer cells, is an antimicrobial peptide (AMP) with known antibacterial function in vertebrates and so in fish. Its presence has been described in different tissues of teleost fish. One of the strongest antimicrobial barriers in fish is skin-secreted mucus; however, this mucus has been found to contain only a small number of AMPs. The present study describes for the first time the constitutive expression of NK-lysin in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) mucus produced by the skin, recording the AMP at a higher concentration than in serum with greater bacteriostatic activity. Hepcidin may be involved to a greater extent in systemic responses since it was expressed to a higher degree in serum which was more potent for alternative complement and peroxidase activities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-413
Number of pages4
JournalFish and Shellfish Immunology
Volume87
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial peptides
  • Hepcidin
  • Innate immune system
  • NK-lysin
  • Salmo salar
  • Serum
  • Skin mucus

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