Plant parasitic nematodes from a forest tree nursery in southern Spain with some notes about the influence of soil storage on the quantitative recovery of Meloidogyne arenaria

Miguel Talavera, JUAN CARLOS MAGUNACELAYA RUMIE, Antonio Tobar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

A nematological survey was carded out in a forest tree nursery in Andujar, southern Spain. Meloidogyne arenaria was found in soil and roots samples from Acacia sp., Biota sp., Juglans regia, Pinus spp., Salix babilonica and Sophora japonica. Pratylenchus vulnus was found in Acacia sp., Cupressus macrocarpa, Juglans regia, Ligustrum japonica, Morus sp., Pinus spp., Populus sp., Salix babilonica and Ulmus pumila. Helicotylenchus sp., Xiphinema americanum and Tylenchorhynchus sp. were found in all the plant species planted in the nursery. Paratylenchus sp., Criconemella sp. and Zygotylenchus guevarai host ranges are also given. The influence of soil storage on the recovery of M. arenaria was studied. At storage temperatures similar to those of the nursery (10-15°C), densities of M. arenaria in soil increased until the sixth week after sampling and were then maintained until the thirteenth week of storage. Incubation temperatures below 16°C during the migration of nematodes through a cottonwool filter, reduced the number of M. arenaria juveniles recovered after 15 h, but increasing migration time up to 39 h could counterbalance this reduction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)261-266
Number of pages6
JournalNematology
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1999

Keywords

  • Criconemella sp.
  • Helicotylenchus sp.
  • Host ranges
  • Paratylenchus sp.
  • Pratylenchus vulnus
  • Temperature
  • Tylenchorhynchus sp.
  • Xiphinema americanum
  • Zygotylenchus guevarai

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