Thermodynamic properties, sorption isotherms and glass transition temperature of cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.)

Antonio Vega-Gálvez, JESSICA CAROLINA LOPEZ PASTEN, Kong Ah-Hen, María José Torres, Roberto Lemus-Mondaca

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Adsorption and desorption isotherms of fresh and dried Cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana L.) were determined at three temperatures (20, 40 and 60 oC) using a gravimetric technique. The data obtained were fitted to several models including Guggenheim-Anderson-De Boer (GAB), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), Henderson, Caurie, Smith, Oswin, Halsey and Iglesias-Chirife. A non-linear least square regression analysis was used to evaluate the models. The Iglesias-Chirife model fitted best the experimental data. Isosteric heat of sorption was also determined from the equilibrium sorption data using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and was found to decrease exponentially with increasing moisture content. The enthalpy-entropy compensation theory was applied to the sorption isotherms and indicated an enthalpy-controlled sorption process. Glass transition temperature (Tg) of Cape gooseberry was also determined by differential scanning calorimetry and modelled as a function of moisture content with the Gordon-Taylor, the Roos and the Khalloufi models, which proved to be excellent tools for predicting glass transition of Cape gooseberry.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-92
Number of pages10
JournalFood Technology and Biotechnology
Volume52
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Cape gooseberry
  • Glass transition temperature
  • Gordon-Taylor model
  • Isosteric heat
  • Modelling
  • Sorption isotherm

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