Use of Mixture Designs to Investigate Contribution of Minor Sex Pheromone Components to Trap Catch of the Carpenterworm Moth, Chilecomadia valdiviana

Stephen L. Lapointe, WILSON ANGEL BARROS PARADA, Eduardo Fuentes-Contreras, Heidy Herrera, Takeshi Kinsho, Yuki Miyake, Randall P. Niedz, JAN BERGMANN

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Field experiments were carried out to study responses of male moths of the carpenterworm, Chilecomadia valdiviana (Lepidoptera: Cossidae), a pest of tree and fruit crops in Chile, to five compounds previously identified from the pheromone glands of females. Previously, attraction of males to the major component, (7Z,10Z)-7,10-hexadecadienal, was clearly demonstrated while the role of the minor components was uncertain due to the use of an experimental design that left large portions of the design space unexplored. We used mixture designs to study the potential contributions to trap catch of the four minor pheromone components produced by C. valdiviana. After systematically exploring the design space described by the five pheromone components, we concluded that the major pheromone component alone is responsible for attraction of male moths in this species. The need for appropriate experimental designs to address the problem of assessing responses to mixtures of semiochemicals in chemical ecology is described. We present an analysis of mixture designs and response surface modeling and an explanation of why this approach is superior to commonly used, but statistically inappropriate, designs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1046-1055
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Chemical Ecology
Volume43
Issue number11-12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • (7Z,10Z)-7,10-hexadecadienal
  • Cossidae
  • Geometric mixture designs
  • Lepidoptera
  • Response surface modeling

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