Effect of Optimized UV-LED Technology on Modeling, Inactivation Kinetics and Microbiological Safety in Tomato Juice

Fernando Salazar, Sebastián Pizarro-Oteíza, Sebastián Molinett, Mariela Labbé

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículorevisión exhaustiva

Resumen

This research analyzed, optimized and modeled the inactivation kinetics of pathogenic bacteria (PB1: Escherichia coli O157:H7 and PB2: Listeria monocytogenes) and determined the microbiological safety of tomato juice processed by UV-LED irradiation and heat treatment. UV-LED processing conditions were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and were 90% power intensity, 21 min and 273–275 nm (251 mJ/cm2) with R2 > 0.96. Using the optimal conditions, levels of PB1 and PB2 resulted a log reduction of 2.89 and 2.74 CFU/mL, respectively. The Weibull model was efficient for estimating the log inactivation of PB1 and PB2 (CFU/mL). The kinetic parameter δ showed that 465.2 mJ/cm2 is needed to achieve a 90% log (CFU/mL) reduction in PB1 and 511.3 mJ/cm2 for PB2. With respect to the scale parameter p > 1, there is a descending concave curve. UV-LED-treated tomato juice had an 11.4% lower Listeria monocytogenes count than heat-treated juice on day 28 (4.0 ± 0.82 °C). Therefore, UV-LED technology could be used to inactivate Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes, preserving tomato juice for microbiological safety, but studies are required to further improve the inactivation of these pathogens and analyze other fruit and vegetable juices.

Idioma originalInglés
Número de artículo430
PublicaciónFoods
Volumen13
N.º3
DOI
EstadoPublicada - feb. 2024

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